Articles by: Special to Charleston Currents

MY TURN: Both sides need to stop gerrymandering

MY TURN: Both sides need to stop gerrymandering

By Elliott Brack, special to Charleston Currents  |  Gerrymandering is nothing less than a majority government being unfair to the minority of its citizens in a particular area.

It is also an obvious case of bullying by the majority government. If it happened on the playground, people would yell, holler and stop it.

Yet it’s happened repeatedly in our halls of government, and no major challenge has risen to outlaw this practice. Why can’t our legislators understand this unfairness, and move to outlaw it?

Lighthouse at Hunting Island State Park.

SC ENCYCLOPEDIA:  South Carolina’s lighthouses

S.C. Encyclopedia  |  South Carolina’s 180-mile coastline is replete with bays, inlets, and harbors. To assist shipping and aid navigation, lighthouses and beacons have dotted the South Carolina coast for centuries. The earliest warning lights were probably bonfires lit to aid ships entering the harbor at Charleston. South Carolina’s first lighthouse, built in 1767, stood on Middle Bay Island (now a part of Morris Island) in the Charleston harbor.

FOCUS, Palm:  Where to start to fix flooding in Charleston County

FOCUS, Palm:  Where to start to fix flooding in Charleston County

By Fred Palm, special to Charleston Currents  |  The driver of future flooding or its prevention lies in Charleston County’s comprehensive land use and the county’s zoning code that is now undergoing review.

Charleston County’s Comprehensive Plan does NOT have water height, e.g., FLOODING, in the plan. Imagine doing a county plan without having looked at an inundation map, let alone defining a land use plan that will accommodate future floods. To continue to muddle through is other than the top-tier governance that we need now.

The next meeting of the countywide planning commission is October 9, 2017, 2 p.m.  There, Charleston County can take immediate action in addressing flooding by crafting the comprehensive plan land use and zoning code to address the water issues.

Anyago Yarbo-Davenport will pay a tribute to opera sensation Leontyne Price.  (Photos provided)

FOCUS: Colour of Music Festival’s 5th year to open Oct. 18 across Charleston

By Allison Savicz, special to Charleston Currents  |  Celebrating five years, the Colour of Music Festival offers a musical kaleidoscope showcasing the impact and historical significance of black classical composers and performers on American and world culture October 18-22, 2017 at various venues in historic Charleston, South Carolina.

The largest black-presenting classical organization in the world, the Colour of Music Festival brings leading black artists from France, Britain, Colombia, the Caribbean, and the United States performing orchestral and choral works, chamber, piano, organ, vocal recitals, and opportunities for community education with over 15 performances.

by · 10/02/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Focus, Good news
TODAY’S FOCUS:  11th annual Defense Summit set for Dec. 5-8 in North Charleston

TODAY’S FOCUS:  11th annual Defense Summit set for Dec. 5-8 in North Charleston

By Heather Walker, special to Charleston Currents  |  Cyber-attacks are on the rise. The most recent cyber-attack impacted 143 million American’s personal information. There is no better time for industry leaders to convene to discuss hot topics involving cyber security, cyber intelligence, and cyber warfare at the CDCA Defense Summit one of the largest in the Southeast.

Walker
Most people don’t know that aside from Charleston’s idyllic beaches and laid back lifestyle, there is a burgeoning, defense tech community. The 2017 economic report for South Carolina states that defense contributes more than $24.1 billion to the annual budget. The dramatic growth of this community involves some of the most innovative offerings surrounding the defense industry.

by · 09/25/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Focus, Good news
FOCUS:  Preserve the Gullah showcases a past that’s under your nose

FOCUS:  Preserve the Gullah showcases a past that’s under your nose

By Asia Batey, special to Charleston Currents  |  Preserve the Gullah has been a three-year effort which all started when three North Charleston locals were introduced to the Sol Legare area, and with the help of their mentor, discovered the wealth of knowledge and history within this small, hidden community.

In 2015 in the midst of statewide flooding and the subsequent damage to the cookie-cutter subdivisions and businesses throughout Charleston, Willie Heyward, Asia Batey and Milton Tyus witnessed homes built many decades ago — by hand, mind you — barely chip a single bit.

Within the first week of moving to the area, they met families who still gardened and ate from the land.  They were taught how to dig up dandelion root and learned of its health benefits, and they discovered that lemon and lavender are perfectly functioning natural mosquito repellents.

by · 09/05/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Focus, Good news
PALM: Time to take sea-level rise, I-526 planning more seriously

PALM: Time to take sea-level rise, I-526 planning more seriously

By Fred Palm, special to Charleston Currents  |  The Union of Concerned Scientists study headlined in in the July 12, 2017, edition of The Post and Courier points to a need to act on factoring sea level rise into the county’s long-range capital plan and beyond its present horizon.

Palm
The foundation of Charleston’s present and future economy and the elements identified in the Charleston County Comprehensive Plan rests on water as many of the county’s other challenges — traffic, housing affordability, balancing a thriving tourism industry with a high quality of life, economic development etc. — is directly and indirectly affected by flooding, storm surge and in our future, varying estimates of sea level rise.

OUR TURN:  7 secrets for dealing with press interviews

OUR TURN:  7 secrets for dealing with press interviews

By Katherine Barrett and Richard Greene, republished with permission  |  We’ve been conducting interviews for an alarmingly long time and the last 25 years of have been largely devoted to talking with state, county and city officials. Based exclusively on personal experience, we’ve developed a solid sense of the things that our interviewees can do that will optimize their chances of communicating their message well.

by · 06/26/2017 · Comments are Disabled · My Turn, Views
FOCUS:  Assessing an almost-invisible population in Charleston

FOCUS: Assessing an almost-invisible population in Charleston

By Becca Hopkins, special to Charleston Currents | People flock to Charleston. They come in droves for the weather, the culture, the food, the slower pace of life. For most people, Charleston is an eminently livable city and both the tourist industry and the pace of residential growth reflect that.

However, there is one almost-invisible population in Charleston that is not enjoying the advantages that Charleston has to offer. Charleston is home to hundreds of individuals under the age of 25 who are either experiencing homelessness or some variety of housing insecurity. An even greater number are experiencing food insecurity, meaning that they don’t get an adequate amount of nutritious food regularly. This population is mixed in with our K-12 students and college students, though there are many who are not in school and are living off the grid and outside of any systems.

FOCUS:  Educators urge governor to sign pension reform bill

FOCUS: Educators urge governor to sign pension reform bill

By Bernadette Hampton, special to Charleston Currents | The South Carolina Education Association encourages residents of Charleston County, especially all educators in the Charleston area, to urge Gov. Henry McMaster to sign the responsible, bipartisan pension funding bill. This bill allows South Carolina to keep its obligations to public employees and remain competitive with other states. And, pensions remain the best bang for the buck for our taxpayers.

Public pensions cover over 549,000 teachers, firefighters and other South Carolina workers. In fact, 1 out 9 South Carolina residents are covered by our pensions systems. With an average benefit of just $21,000 a year, pensions provide a modest but dignified retirement for our public employees. Under this bill, teachers will contribute a greater percentage of their pay, now 9 percent of pay, toward their pension, sharing the sacrifice of increase with the state.

by · 04/24/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Focus, Good news