Post Tagged with: "Marjory Wentworth"

Wentworth

SC ENCYCLOPEDIA:  Marjory Wentworth, poet laureate

Editor’s Note:  For the last five weeks, we’ve profiled South Carolina’s past poet laureates.  Here is a look at our current poet laureate, who also is a contributing editor to Charleston Currents. Wentworth curates a monthly South Carolina-related poem in our Palmetto Poem section. S.C. Encyclopedia  | Born in Lynn, Massachusetts, on June 3, 1958, Marjory Heath Wentworth is the […]

by · 10/30/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, S.C. Encyclopedia
COMMENTARY, Brack:  Alexander offers a lesson of poetry’s power

COMMENTARY, Brack:  Alexander offers a lesson of poetry’s power

Kwame Alexander was the keynote speaker of Saturday’s Black Ink, a gathering of four dozen writers celebrating African American writing in a six-hour book festival that filled the main library.  The festival, now in its second year, reportedly did very well, with writers selling two or three times as many books to hundreds of attendees.

In a poignant talk about memories ranging from a boyhood spent selling books for his father to his mother’s recent death, Alexander kept his audience spellbound with his passionate, strong voice.

But an extended version of a relatively new poem, “Take a Knee,” cut to the core.  It showed how a rat-a-tat-tat of common-day phrases starting with the word “take” can generate real emotion and lead, perhaps, to new ways of considering issues.

by · 09/25/2017 · 2 comments · Andy Brack, Views
PALMETTO POEM: Carolina Umbra

PALMETTO POEM: Carolina Umbra

By Marjory Wentworth, S.C. poet laureate

Boats fly out of the Atlantic
and moor themselves in my backyard
where tiny flowers, forgotten
by the wind, toss their astral heads
from side to side.  Mouths ablaze, open,
and filling with rain.

After the hurricane, you can see
the snapped open drawbridge slide
beneath the waves on the evening news.
You go cold imagining
such enormous fingers of wind
that split a steel hinge until
its jaw opens toward heaven.

PALMETTO POEM, Meyers: back from the woods inside me

PALMETTO POEM, Meyers: back from the woods inside me

By Susan Laughter Meyers

back from the woods inside me
chickadee silence

nothing I can say to myself so full
the not saying

when I opened the nesting box
what looked slight

GOOD NEWS:  Wentworth collaborates in new national book of poetry

GOOD NEWS: Wentworth collaborates in new national book of poetry

Staff reports | Charleston Currents contributing editor and South Carolina Poet Laureate Marjory Wentworth’s work is getting attention in a new national book that targets middle-school children to open their eyes to the joys of poetry. Out of Wonder: Poems Celebrating Poets is a collection of original poems by Newbery Medal–winning author and poet Kwame Alexander, along with poems by teacher-poet Chris Colderley and Wentworth.

Also in Good News: Library to take part in summer feeding program; Tall ship makes it to Charleston; and North Charleston Fire Department wins coveted Class 1 ISO rating.

by · 04/30/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Good news, News briefs
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. delivering a speech.

FOCUS: Poetry, politics, Dr. King and our beloved community

By Marjory Wentworth, poet laureate of South Carolina | I am guessing there won’t be a poem at this week’s presidential inauguration. Too bad, because now is the time to think like a poet.

Through empathy, precise language and imagery, poets connect us to the things of this world and to one another. No one understood this better than the late Winston Churchill, who hand-wrote his speeches in iambic pentameter. This five stress line of verse is essentially the length of the average sentence written in the English language and can be said in one breath. Churchill had to inspire a nation under attack, and he accomplished this in ways that will be remembered forever.

by · 01/16/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Focus, Good news
FOCUS: Making Emanuels out of us all

FOCUS: Making Emanuels out of us all

By Marjorie Wentworth, contributing editor | The relatives and friends of the nine people murdered on June 17, 2015, are facing a second New Year’s without their loved ones.

The strength and dignity the bereaved have displayed during the killer’s trial is an extension of the goodness of those who died at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church. And we all must keep telling their stories — to remind us of who they were and all that we could be.

by · 01/02/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Focus, Good news
WENTWORTH: New Charleston book grew after “my heart was broken”

WENTWORTH: New Charleston book grew after “my heart was broken”

By Marjory Wentworth, contributing editor | In our very first television interview about our book We Are Charleston, Tragedy and Triumph at Mother Emanuel, the reporter thrust the microphone in my face and asked “Why would a white woman want to write this book?”

I was standing between my African American co-writers, Herb Frazier and Dr. Bernard Powers, at the time, and the question took me by surprise, but it shouldn’t have. I wanted to respond that if he had done his research, the reporter might have asked the opposite question; how could I not write this book?

by · 06/13/2016 · 1 comment · Focus, Good news
Dozens of bouquets lined a sidewalk last year outside Emanuel AME Church in Charleston.

BRACK: The remarkable story of forgiveness in Charleston

By Andy Brack, editor and publisher | Almost a year later, the remarkable words of family members in pain still ring in our ears.

“I forgive you,” one said in a crowded courtroom. “May God have mercy on you,” another added. “Hate won’t win,” said a third.

One after another, five people squeezed by turmoil forgave an accused killer, who stood pancake-faced in shackles in a separate room and watched his bond hearing on a television screen.

by · 06/13/2016 · Comments are Disabled · Andy Brack, Views
FOCUS:  Music of doves ascending

FOCUS: Music of doves ascending

A poem by Marjory Wentworth, poet laureate of South Carolina:

Yellow crime tape tied to the rod iron fence
weaves through bouquets of flowers
and wreaths made of white ribbons,
like rivers of bright pain flowing through the hours.

Weaving through bouquets of flowers,
lines of strangers bearing offerings
like rivers of bright pain flowing through the hours.
One week later; the funeral bells ring;

lines of strangers still bring offerings.
Nine doves tossed toward the sun.
One week later; the funeral bells ring,
while churches in small towns are burning.

Nine doves tossed toward the sun.
Because there are no words to sing,
while churches in small towns are burning,
a blur of white wings, ascends like music.

by · 06/06/2016 · Comments are Disabled · Focus, Good news, Palmetto Poem