Reviews

REVIEW: The Couple Next Door

REVIEW: The Couple Next Door

The Couple Next Door (2016)  is Shari Lapena’s first foray into the thriller genre and it is a winner. Anne and Marco Conti are good friends with their next-door neighbors, Cynthia and Graham. A dinner party planned for Cynthia’s house is in jeopardy because the Conti’s babysitter called off. Marco talks his wife into leaving the six-month old home alone, provided they check on her every 30 minutes. Anne is reluctant, but agrees. All is well until they decide to go home around 1:00 am and find the front door ajar and the baby gone.

REVIEW:  Miss Hokusai, a film directed by Keiichi Hara

REVIEW:  Miss Hokusai, a film directed by Keiichi Hara

Tama R. Howard: O-Ei Katsushika “narrates” this incredibly beautiful film that spotlights the strange life and long career of the famed Japanese painter, Hokusai Katsushika.

by · 10/02/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, Reviews
REVIEW: A Really Good Day, by Ayelet Waldman

REVIEW: A Really Good Day, by Ayelet Waldman

Jen McQueen: “Writer Ayelet Waldman (Bad Mother) tried everything – meditation, psychotherapy, therapy, and prescription drugs – to treat her depression, premenstrual dysphoric disorder, and mood swings. Yet despite years of effort, this talented and successful woman continued to drive herself, her friends, and her family – including a saintly husband, the writer Michael Chabon – bonkers.”

by · 09/25/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, Reviews
REVIEW:  Piece of the World, by Christina Baker Kline

REVIEW:  Piece of the World, by Christina Baker Kline

Review by Michel Hammes | From the author of Orphan Train, comes another historical fiction piece about the imagined life of the muse in Andrew Wyeth’s painting Christina’s World. Kline weaves fact and fiction to tell a compelling story about Christina, living on her family’s rural farm, dealing with illness and coming to terms with the prospect of leading a small life.

by · 09/18/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, Reviews
REVIEW:  Down by the Riverside: A South Carolina Slave Community

REVIEW:  Down by the Riverside: A South Carolina Slave Community

Reviewed by Marianne Cawley | The splendid reputation of this book is completely well deserved.  Published in 1984, Down by the Riverside was one of a new wave of works of history that looked at a specific defined community over an extended period in the hope that better understanding of the parts would bring greater knowledge of the whole history of a wider region.

by · 09/11/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, Reviews
REVIEW:  My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She’s Sorry by Fredrik Backman

REVIEW: My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She’s Sorry by Fredrik Backman

Reviewed by Michel Hammes: “In another intriguing tale from the author of A Man Called Ove, you meet a collection of characters living in an apartment complex in Britain. Elsa is a young girl trying to find her way in a world where she doesn’t fit. Her grandmother is her best friend and with a penchant for mischievousness- the two often get up to trouble in hilarious ways.”

by · 07/17/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, Reviews
REVIEW:    Lockdown by Laurie R. King

REVIEW:    Lockdown by Laurie R. King

Linda Stewart: Career Day is to be the defining moment of Principal Linda McDonald’s tenure at Guadalupe Middle School.  This struggling school has dealt with so much bad press over the last year – the murder of a former student, the disappearance of a sixth-grader. 

by · 07/10/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, Reviews
REVIEW:  Lowcountry Boil by Susan M. Boyer

REVIEW:  Lowcountry Boil by Susan M. Boyer

Reviewed by Whitney Lebron: What had me grab this book off the shelf was: a) it had Lowcountry in the title, and b) the line on the back saying, “Private Investigator Liz Talbot is a modern Southern belle: she blesses hearts and takes names.”.  I decided right then and there to read this book.  I was not disappointed in the slightest. 

by · 07/03/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, Reviews
REVIEW:   Under the Harrow by Flynn Berry

REVIEW:   Under the Harrow by Flynn Berry

Reviewed by Mike Nelson | Under the Harrow {Flynn Berry) is an intriguing look at the relationship between two sisters, Nora and Rachel. Rachel is a successful nurse, living close to Oxford, an hour’s train ride from London. Her slightly younger sister, Rachel, has an ill-defined job in the city. On one of her many weekend visits, Nora arrives at Rachel’s house to find her sister brutally killed.

by · 06/26/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, Reviews
REVIEW:  Penguin the Magpie: The Odd Little Bird Who Saved a Family

REVIEW:  Penguin the Magpie: The Odd Little Bird Who Saved a Family

Reviewed by Jessica Smith | Penguin the Magpie: The Odd Little Bird Who Saved a Family is the true story of one family’s startling encounter with sudden loss and their subsequent journey to hope and healing. Cameron Bloom recounts his wife’s terrible accident, which leaves her paralyzed and feeling hopeless. As Sam – and her family – grapples with the hardships of her new life, her three sons find a severely injured magpie chick.

by · 06/12/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, Reviews