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John C. Calhoun in 1849, a year before his death. Image is a whole-plate daguerreotype by Mathew Brady valued at $338,500 at auction in 2011. Via Wikipedia.

HISTORY: John C. Calhoun

S.C. Encyclopedia | John Caldwell Calhoun was born in Abbeville District on March 18, 1782, the third son of Patrick Calhoun, an upcountry planter and former legislator, and Martha Caldwell. A prodigy, the young Calhoun lost his father at an early age. His older brothers, William and James, already successful cotton planters and merchants, helped finance his education. Calhoun attended rural upcountry academies before entering Yale at age twenty and graduating in two years. He then attended Litchfield Law School in Connecticut before reading law in Charleston with the distinguished attorney William Henry DeSaussure, a prominent Federalist. Calhoun returned to Abbeville and began the practice of law,

by · 01/09/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, S.C. Encyclopedia
REVIEW:  Digging Up the Dirt

REVIEW: Digging Up the Dirt

Reviewed by Whitney Lebron | The latest installment of the Southern Ladies Mystery Series by Miranda James, Digging Up the Dirt brings back the two sassy sisters, An’gel and Dickce (pronounced Dixie) Ducote. Gone with the Wind meets Miss Marple in Miranda James’s Southern Ladies Mystery series.

by · 01/02/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, Reviews
Traditionalists may wonder why tomatoes and scallions are pictured in this version of hoppin' john.  We can't give you the answer but will attest to the opinion that the added combination makes the dish extra good -- the editors.

HISTORY: Hoppin’ John

S.C. Encyclopedia | Hoppin’ John is a pilaf made with beans and rice. The recipe came directly to America from West Africa and is typical of the one-pot cooking of the South Carolina Lowcountry. As the recipe moved inland, it became the traditional dish for good luck on New Year’s Day throughout the South.

The first written appearance of the recipe in English was in Sarah Rutledge’s The Carolina Housewife, or House and Home, by a Lady of Charleston, published anonymously in 1847. Though most often made with black-eyed peas, the original Charleston version called for “One pound of bacon, one pint of red peas, one pint of rice.” Red peas are cowpeas, or dried field peas, which are, as are black-eyed peas, more akin to beans.

by · 01/01/2017 · Comments are Disabled · S.C. Encyclopedia
REVIEW:  Rest Ye Murdered Gentlemen

REVIEW: Rest Ye Murdered Gentlemen

A mystery by Vicki Delany: Ever wanted to immerse yourself in Christmas Town? Although Rudolph, New York, may not be called Christmas Town, it celebrates Christmas all year long. But this December might not be full of comfort and joy, as a murder is about to create havoc in this peaceful place.

by · 12/19/2016 · Comments are Disabled · Features, Reviews
HISTORY:  Operation Lost Trust

HISTORY: Operation Lost Trust

S.C. Encyclopedia | Operation Lost Trust was arguably South Carolina’s largest and longest-running political scandal. Including the investigation, trials, and retrials, the Operation Lost Trust saga extended from 1989 to 1999.

by · 12/19/2016 · Comments are Disabled · Features, S.C. Encyclopedia
REVIEW:  Rise of the Legend

REVIEW: Rise of the Legend

Reviewed by Tama R. Howard: “Rise of the Legend” is a Chinese film that stars Sammo Hung as crime boss Master Lui and Eddie Peng as Wong Fei, a gifted martial arts prodigy who is out for revenge.

by · 12/11/2016 · Comments are Disabled · Reviews
HISTORY:  South Carolina’s judicial system

HISTORY: South Carolina’s judicial system

S.C. Encyclopedia | The purpose of any state judicial system is to resolve civil disputes among residents and to determine the guilt or innocence of persons accused of crimes and infractions. Article V of the state constitution provides for a uniform system of justice throughout the state.

by · 12/11/2016 · Comments are Disabled · Features, S.C. Encyclopedia
REVIEW:  Lafayette in the Somewhat United States

REVIEW: Lafayette in the Somewhat United States

Reviewed by Jennifer Lively: Sarah Vowell’s latest work, Lafayette in the Somewhat United States, published last fall, quickly found an audience among readers whose daily lives have been inundated with stories regarding the Founding Fathers. From the latest Broadway sensation, Hamilton, and talk of changing the face on the $20 bill, to patriotic bellows seeking to “make America great again,” the country’s revolutionary lore is seemingly at an all-time high.

by · 12/05/2016 · Comments are Disabled · Features, Reviews
HISTORY:  Reconstruction in South Carolina

HISTORY: Reconstruction in South Carolina

S.C. Encyclopedia | The final defeat of the Confederacy in 1865 brought an important and difficult problem for the federal government: how were the defeated states to be brought back into the Union? Most agreed that this should be accomplished as rapidly as possible, but not so rapidly that the planter elite that had led the South in secession would be able to renew the rebellion or reverse the results of the war. The South would have to remain under federal control until it was deemed safe to leave matters to the southern state governments. This probationary period of federal control was termed “Reconstruction.”

by · 12/05/2016 · Comments are Disabled · Features, S.C. Encyclopedia
PALMETTO POEM:  How to embrace and how to let go

PALMETTO POEM: How to embrace and how to let go

Build a world around

a man standing at a window.

He doesn’t even have to be

a man.

He can even sit.

The window can be a mirror,

and it can be a wall.

by · 12/05/2016 · Comments are Disabled · Features, Palmetto Poem