Features

HISTORY: Lighthouses

HISTORY: Lighthouses

S.C. Encyclopedia | South Carolina’s 180-mile coastline is replete with bays, inlets, and harbors. To assist shipping and aid navigation, lighthouses and beacons have dotted the South Carolina coast for centuries. The earliest warning lights were probably bonfires lit to aid ships entering the harbor at Charleston. South Carolina’s first lighthouse, built in 1767, stood on Middle Bay Island (now a part of Morris Island) in the Charleston harbor.

by · 04/03/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, S.C. Encyclopedia
PALMETTO POEM:  A Suite to Ashley Marina

PALMETTO POEM: A Suite to Ashley Marina

An excerpt from a poem by Ann Herlong Bodman

On Jeff’s boat, his girlfriend sunbathes topless,

cigarette smoke curling from the bowsprit.

Jeff watches—they never talk. Boats nod

as if they approve. Workmen sing,

by · 04/03/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, Palmetto Poem
MYSTERY:  Fleeting moment

MYSTERY: Fleeting moment

John’s Island resident Deborah Getter sent along this image a while back to stump fellow readers. About the best we can tell you is that it’s not from around here. Send your best guess to: editor@charlestoncurrents.com — and make sure to include the name of the town in which you live.

by · 04/03/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, S.C. Encyclopedia
Ravenel

HISTORY: Charles D. “Pug” Ravenel

S.C. Encyclopedia | Charles “Pug” Ravenel was born in Charleston on February 14, 1938, the son of Charles F. Ravenel and Yvonne Marie Michel. A football standout in high school in Charleston, he graduated from Bishop England (1956), Philips Exeter Academy (1957), Harvard University (1961), and Harvard Business School (M.B.A., 1964). He was first marshall (president) of Harvard’s graduating class and corecipient of the Bingham Award for most outstanding athlete. He worked on Wall Street from 1964 to 1972 and as a White House fellow at the U.S. Treasury Department (1966–1967). Ravenel returned to Charleston and established a merchant-banking firm. He married Mary Curtis on December 26, 1963. They have three children. Following a divorce, he married Susan Gibbes Woodward on November 30, 1991.

REVIEW:  The Woman in Cabin 10, by Ruth Ware

REVIEW: The Woman in Cabin 10, by Ruth Ware

Reviewed by Lua Wells: Have you ever dreamed about being a travel writer assigned to take trips and explore the world? What a treat it would be to stay in luxury accommodations and have elegant (and expensive) meals on someone else’s dime. “The Woman in Cabin 10” by Ruth Ware allows you to imagine what that’s like.

by · 03/20/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, Reviews
Carolina parakeets, illustrated by John James Audubon in 1833.  Via Wikipedia.

HISTORY: Carolina parakeet

S.C. Encyclopedia | Now extinct, the Carolina parakeet (Conuropsis carolinensis) was a dove-sized (about thirty-five centimeters long) bird with a bright green body, yellow head, and orange face. Mark Catesby, an English naturalist living in Charleston, painted the parakeet in 1731, thus providing the first scientific description of the species. The species was abundant in early America, and its range extended to New York, Colorado, and Florida. The Carolina parakeet was well known for its ability to withstand harsh winters, due to the winter availability of its main foods: cockleburs, thistle seeds, and sandspurs.

by · 03/20/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, S.C. Encyclopedia
Hand-colored etching of a bald eagle from Catesby's seminal two-volume work, which was on private display over the weekend.  Originals will be displayed over the summer at the Gibbes Museum of Art in a special show of watercolors from the Royal Collection in England.

HISTORY: Mark Catesby, artist, naturalist

S.C. Encyclopedia | Mark Catesby was born in or near the village of Castle Hedingham, Essex, England, on March 24, 1682, the son of John Catesby and Elizabeth Jekyll. Little is known of his early life, but he probably attended the grammar school in the nearby town of Sudbury.

by · 03/13/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, S.C. Encyclopedia
HISTORY:  Prehistoric South Carolina

HISTORY: Prehistoric South Carolina

S.C. Encyclopedia | Sometime during the last Ice Age human groups made their way to what became South Carolina. Current debate about the continent of origin of these immigrants suggests Asia, Africa, and Europe. Recent evidence, although scant, has suggested the possibility of humans in South Carolina as early as 18,000 years ago, but a time frame beginning by about 13,000 years ago is widely accepted by archaeologists.

by · 03/06/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, S.C. Encyclopedia
PALMETTO POEM: Charleston, South Carolina

PALMETTO POEM: Charleston, South Carolina

By Amy Lowell | FIFTEEN years is not a long time,
But long enough to build a city over and destroy it;
Long enough to clean a forty-year growth of grass from between cobblestones,
And run street-car lines straight across the heart of romance.
Commerce, are you worth this?
I should like to bring a case to trial:

by · 03/06/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, Palmetto Poem
REVIEW:  Apprentice in Death by J.D. Robb

REVIEW: Apprentice in Death by J.D. Robb

Reviewed by Jennifer Myers | RApprentice in Death is book 43 in J.D. Robb’s (a pseudonym for Nora Roberts) long-running futuristic series about a police detective Eve Dallas and her businessman husband Roarke. This fast-paced thriller starts when a sniper kills three seemingly random victims at Central Park’s ice-skating rink. Roarke develops a genius computer program to track down the location of the sniper and the New York Police and Security Department (NYPSD) is shocked to realize there are two snipers.

by · 02/27/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, Reviews