Features

Amaker (Image by Lisa Livingston)

PALMETTO POEM:  Stagnation (a letter 2 America)

By Marcus Amaker, poet laureate of Charleston, S.C.

Amaker (Image by Lisa Livingston)
America has built
too many monuments to war.
Man-made maladies
mounted on Mother Earth.
I’ve seen scars on the skin
of our country’s landscape –
blood-stained band aids
covering exposed bones;
a pain that has not healed.

by · 10/02/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, Palmetto Poem
Hyer

SC ENCYCLOPEDIA:  Helen von Kolnitz Hyer, poet laureate

S.C. Encyclopedia  |  Helen von Kolnitz Hyer was born on Dec. 0, 1896, in Charleston, to George von Kolnitz and Sarah Holmes. She attended Simmons College from 1917 to 1918 and married Edward Hyer in 1921. The couple had four daughters. From childhood she had a love of poetry and memorized poems from a book of nineteenth-century English verse, reciting them to visitors at her grandparents’ home in Mount Pleasant.

by · 10/02/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, S.C. Encyclopedia
REVIEW: A Really Good Day, by Ayelet Waldman

REVIEW: A Really Good Day, by Ayelet Waldman

Jen McQueen: “Writer Ayelet Waldman (Bad Mother) tried everything – meditation, psychotherapy, therapy, and prescription drugs – to treat her depression, premenstrual dysphoric disorder, and mood swings. Yet despite years of effort, this talented and successful woman continued to drive herself, her friends, and her family – including a saintly husband, the writer Michael Chabon – bonkers.”

by · 09/25/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, Reviews
S.C. ENCYCLOPEDIA:  Archibald Rutledge, poet

S.C. ENCYCLOPEDIA:  Archibald Rutledge, poet

S.C. Encyclopedia  |  Archibald Rutledge was born in McClellanville, South Carolina, on October 23, 1883, the son of Henry Middleton Rutledge III, an army officer, and Margaret Hamilton. Descended from a lineage of notable South Carolinians, Rutledge included among his ancestors John Rutledge, Edward Rutledge, Arthur Middleton, Charles Cotesworth Pinckney, and Thomas Pinckney.

by · 09/25/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, S.C. Encyclopedia
REVIEW:  Piece of the World, by Christina Baker Kline

REVIEW:  Piece of the World, by Christina Baker Kline

Review by Michel Hammes | From the author of Orphan Train, comes another historical fiction piece about the imagined life of the muse in Andrew Wyeth’s painting Christina’s World. Kline weaves fact and fiction to tell a compelling story about Christina, living on her family’s rural farm, dealing with illness and coming to terms with the prospect of leading a small life.

by · 09/18/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, Reviews
S.C. ENCYCLOPEDIA:  Colleton County

S.C. ENCYCLOPEDIA:  Colleton County

S.C. Encyclopedia  |  First visited by Robert Sandford in 1666 while he was reconnoitering the southeastern seaboard of North America for Lord Anthony Ashley Cooper, Colleton County was one of three original counties organized in the English province of Carolina in 1682. However, Colleton was divided into three parishes by 1730 (St. Bartholomew’s, St. Paul’s, and St. John’s Colleton), which took over most county responsibilities, including oversight of elections.

by · 09/18/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, S.C. Encyclopedia
REVIEW:  Down by the Riverside: A South Carolina Slave Community

REVIEW:  Down by the Riverside: A South Carolina Slave Community

Reviewed by Marianne Cawley | The splendid reputation of this book is completely well deserved.  Published in 1984, Down by the Riverside was one of a new wave of works of history that looked at a specific defined community over an extended period in the hope that better understanding of the parts would bring greater knowledge of the whole history of a wider region.

by · 09/11/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, Reviews
PALMETTO POEM: Carolina Umbra

PALMETTO POEM: Carolina Umbra

By Marjory Wentworth, S.C. poet laureate

Boats fly out of the Atlantic
and moor themselves in my backyard
where tiny flowers, forgotten
by the wind, toss their astral heads
from side to side.  Mouths ablaze, open,
and filling with rain.

After the hurricane, you can see
the snapped open drawbridge slide
beneath the waves on the evening news.
You go cold imagining
such enormous fingers of wind
that split a steel hinge until
its jaw opens toward heaven.

SC ENCYCLOPEDIA:  Hurricanes

SC ENCYCLOPEDIA:  Hurricanes

S.C. Encyclopedia  |  The term “hurricane” comes from the West Indian word “huracan,” which means “big wind” and is used to describe severe tropical cyclones in the Atlantic Ocean, Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean Sea, and the eastern Pacific Ocean. In the western Pacific, hurricanes are known as typhoons. The development of a hurricane requires an area of low pressure in a region of favorable atmospheric and oceanic conditions. Ocean temperatures must be near or greater than 80 ̊ F and wind speeds at mid- and upper-levels of the atmosphere must be light.

by · 09/11/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, S.C. Encyclopedia
Gullah/Geechee Corridor

HISTORY:  Gullah

From the S.C. Encyclopedia  |  The term “Gullah,” or “Geechee,” describes a unique group of African Americans descended from enslaved Africans who settled in the Sea Islands and Lowcountry of South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, and North Carolina.

The term “Gullah,” or “Geechee,” describes a unique group of African Americans descended from enslaved Africans who settled in the Sea Islands and Lowcountry of South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, and North Carolina. Most of these slaves were brought to the area to cultivate rice since they hailed from the Rice Coast of West Africa, a region that stretches from modern Senegal to southern Liberia.