S.C. Encyclopedia

HISTORY:  Reconstruction in South Carolina

HISTORY: Reconstruction in South Carolina

S.C. Encyclopedia | The final defeat of the Confederacy in 1865 brought an important and difficult problem for the federal government: how were the defeated states to be brought back into the Union? Most agreed that this should be accomplished as rapidly as possible, but not so rapidly that the planter elite that had led the South in secession would be able to renew the rebellion or reverse the results of the war. The South would have to remain under federal control until it was deemed safe to leave matters to the southern state governments. This probationary period of federal control was termed “Reconstruction.”

by · 12/05/2016 · Comments are Disabled · Features, S.C. Encyclopedia
HISTORY:  Sunset Lodge

HISTORY: Sunset Lodge

S.C. Encyclopedia | An internationally known brothel, the Sunset Lodge, founded about 1936, was located in a white frame house adorned by neon on U.S. Highway 17 originally three miles south of Georgetown’s limits. The business was reportedly encouraged by business leaders, including Tom Yawkey, a Massachusetts millionaire who owned a resort home near Georgetown. They wanted to divert the attentions of workers building the International Paper Company mill at Georgetown from their local women.

by · 11/28/2016 · Comments are Disabled · Features, S.C. Encyclopedia
Byrnes

HISTORY: James F. Byrnes, state and national leader

S.C. Encyclopedia | James Francis Byrnes was born in Charleston on May 2, 1882, the son of James Francis Byrnes, an Irish Catholic city clerk, and his Irish Catholic wife, Elizabeth McSweeney. Seven weeks before his birth, Byrnes’s father died of tuberculosis, leaving “Jimmy” to be reared by his widowed mother. She had gone briefly to New York to learn dressmaking in order to support him, his sister, an invalid grandmother, an aunt, and a nephew. In his early teens Byrnes left school to work in a Charleston law office to help support the family.

by · 11/21/2016 · Comments are Disabled · Features, S.C. Encyclopedia
Tillman

HISTORY: “Pitchfork” Ben Tillman, governor, U.S. senator

S.C. Encyclopedia | Benjamin Ryan Tillman was born in Edgefield District on August 11, 1847, to Benjamin and Sophia Tillman. The family was wealthy in land and slaves, and Ben Tillman was educated in local schoolhouses and on the family’s acres. A serious illness at the age of sixteen cost him his left eye, and his convalescence kept him out of Confederate service. In 1868 he married Sallie Starke. They had seven children.

by · 11/14/2016 · Comments are Disabled · Features, S.C. Encyclopedia
REVIEW:  The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up:

REVIEW: The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up:

Reviewed by Christine Strampp | Has your New Year’s resolution of decluttering your house not been achieved yet? Then “The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing” might be the book for you. Marie Kondo guides you through the decluttering and organizing of your home, but it is not your usual organizing method. Her method involves surrounding yourself with only items that you love or need. The rest of your “stuff” goes to a donation center or the garbage. It is liberating to let things go that you really did not need or love. When you are done with this process, items that “Spark Joy” will surround you.

by · 11/07/2016 · Comments are Disabled · Features, S.C. Encyclopedia
HISTORY:  241 years ago: Continental regiments for S.C.

HISTORY: 241 years ago: Continental regiments for S.C.

S.C. Encyclopedia | In the aftermath of the battles at Lexington and Concord, the Continental Congress passed resolutions that created the Continental army in June 1775. Accordingly, a committee addressed the need for maintaining a regular army, and Congress began the task of apportioning quotas to the states. On November 4, 1775, Congress resolved to maintain “at the continental expense” three battalions for the defense of South Carolina. Continental regiments were units authorized for use by the Continental Congress and were distinct from state militia forces.

by · 11/07/2016 · Comments are Disabled · Features, S.C. Encyclopedia
Alston

HISTORY: Joseph Alston, governor

Scion of one of the great rice planting families of Georgetown District, Joseph Alston was born ca. 1778, the son of William “King Billy” Alston and Mary Ashe. Educated by private tutors, Alston attended the College of Charleston from 1793 to 1794. In 1795 he entered the junior class of the College of New Jersey (later Princeton), but withdrew before graduating. Alston studied law under Edward Rutledge, who predicted a brilliant future for his pupil. Admitted to the bar in 1799, Alston practiced only occasionally, devoting his career to the management of his extensive rice plantations in All Saints Parish, comprising 6,287 acres and 204 slaves.

by · 10/31/2016 · Comments are Disabled · Features, S.C. Encyclopedia
HISTORY:  South Caroliniana Library

HISTORY: South Caroliniana Library

S.C. Encyclopedia | The South Caroliniana Library building was completed in 1840 as the central library building for South Carolina College (later the University of South Carolina). It was the first freestanding college library building in the United States, predating those of Harvard (1841), Yale (1846), and Princeton (1873).

by · 10/24/2016 · Comments are Disabled · Features, S.C. Encyclopedia
HISTORY:  Susan Pringle Frost (1873-1960)

HISTORY: Susan Pringle Frost (1873-1960)

S.C. Encyclopedia | Susan Pringle Frost was born in Charleston on January 21, 1873, the daughter of Dr. Francis LeJau Frost and Rebecca Brewton Pringle. With ties to several distinguished Charleston families dating back to the eighteenth century, Frost seemed destined to be a lady of leisure following a privileged childhood and two years (1889-1891) at the prominent Saint Mary’s Episcopal boarding school in Raleigh, North Carolina.

by · 10/17/2016 · Comments are Disabled · Features, S.C. Encyclopedia
HISTORY:  Hurricanes

HISTORY: Hurricanes

S.C. Encyclopedia | The term “hurricane” comes from the West Indian word “huracan,” which means “big wind” and is used to describe severe tropical cyclones in the Atlantic Ocean, Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean Sea, and the eastern Pacific Ocean.

by · 10/09/2016 · Comments are Disabled · Features, S.C. Encyclopedia