S.C. Encyclopedia

Otter Island in the ACE Basin, via Wikipedia.

HISTORY: ACE Basin

S.C. Encyclopedia | The ACE Basin consists of around 350,000 acres in the watershed of the Ashepoo, Combahee, and Edisto Rivers in the South Carolina Lowcountry, which drains one-fifth of the state. The ACE Basin encompasses a range of ecosystem types from forested uplands to tidal marsh (salt, brackish, and fresh water). The basin is home for more than 260 permanent and seasonal bird species and seventeen rare or endangered species, including the wood stork and the loggerhead turtle.

HISTORY: Emancipation

HISTORY: Emancipation

Excerpted from the S.C. Encyclopedia | The experience of slavery’s demise varied around the state and followed the progress of the Civil War. Freedom came early and suddenly to Port Royal when on November 7, 1861, Union forces bombarded and occupied the area. Black Carolinians in the vicinity referred to this occasion as the “Day of the Big Gun Shoot,” and during the next several weeks Federal troops seized Beaufort, the rest of Hilton Head, St. Helena, Ladys, and other nearby islands. Most planters fled the Federal troops and attempted to persuade or coerce their slaves to accompany them northward toward Charleston or into the interior, away from the path of the invasion. While many relocated with their owners, a substantial number resisted evacuation; some were killed for their refusal.

HISTORY: Lighthouses

HISTORY: Lighthouses

S.C. Encyclopedia | South Carolina’s 180-mile coastline is replete with bays, inlets, and harbors. To assist shipping and aid navigation, lighthouses and beacons have dotted the South Carolina coast for centuries. The earliest warning lights were probably bonfires lit to aid ships entering the harbor at Charleston. South Carolina’s first lighthouse, built in 1767, stood on Middle Bay Island (now a part of Morris Island) in the Charleston harbor.

MYSTERY:  Fleeting moment

MYSTERY: Fleeting moment

John’s Island resident Deborah Getter sent along this image a while back to stump fellow readers. About the best we can tell you is that it’s not from around here. Send your best guess to: editor@charlestoncurrents.com — and make sure to include the name of the town in which you live.

Ravenel

HISTORY: Charles D. “Pug” Ravenel

S.C. Encyclopedia | Charles “Pug” Ravenel was born in Charleston on February 14, 1938, the son of Charles F. Ravenel and Yvonne Marie Michel. A football standout in high school in Charleston, he graduated from Bishop England (1956), Philips Exeter Academy (1957), Harvard University (1961), and Harvard Business School (M.B.A., 1964). He was first marshall (president) of Harvard’s graduating class and corecipient of the Bingham Award for most outstanding athlete. He worked on Wall Street from 1964 to 1972 and as a White House fellow at the U.S. Treasury Department (1966–1967). Ravenel returned to Charleston and established a merchant-banking firm. He married Mary Curtis on December 26, 1963. They have three children. Following a divorce, he married Susan Gibbes Woodward on November 30, 1991.

Carolina parakeets, illustrated by John James Audubon in 1833.  Via Wikipedia.

HISTORY: Carolina parakeet

S.C. Encyclopedia | Now extinct, the Carolina parakeet (Conuropsis carolinensis) was a dove-sized (about thirty-five centimeters long) bird with a bright green body, yellow head, and orange face. Mark Catesby, an English naturalist living in Charleston, painted the parakeet in 1731, thus providing the first scientific description of the species. The species was abundant in early America, and its range extended to New York, Colorado, and Florida. The Carolina parakeet was well known for its ability to withstand harsh winters, due to the winter availability of its main foods: cockleburs, thistle seeds, and sandspurs.

by · 03/20/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, S.C. Encyclopedia
Hand-colored etching of a bald eagle from Catesby's seminal two-volume work, which was on private display over the weekend.  Originals will be displayed over the summer at the Gibbes Museum of Art in a special show of watercolors from the Royal Collection in England.

HISTORY: Mark Catesby, artist, naturalist

S.C. Encyclopedia | Mark Catesby was born in or near the village of Castle Hedingham, Essex, England, on March 24, 1682, the son of John Catesby and Elizabeth Jekyll. Little is known of his early life, but he probably attended the grammar school in the nearby town of Sudbury.

by · 03/13/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, S.C. Encyclopedia
HISTORY:  Prehistoric South Carolina

HISTORY: Prehistoric South Carolina

S.C. Encyclopedia | Sometime during the last Ice Age human groups made their way to what became South Carolina. Current debate about the continent of origin of these immigrants suggests Asia, Africa, and Europe. Recent evidence, although scant, has suggested the possibility of humans in South Carolina as early as 18,000 years ago, but a time frame beginning by about 13,000 years ago is widely accepted by archaeologists.

by · 03/06/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, S.C. Encyclopedia
Harleston

HISTORY: Edwin A. Harleston

S.C. Encyclopedia | Edwin Augustus “Teddy” Harleston was born in Charleston on March 14, 1882, to the shipper-turned-mortician Edwin Gailliard Harleston and Louisa Moultrie. Harleston won a scholarship to the Avery Normal Institute and graduated valedictorian of his class in 1900. He graduated from Atlanta University in 1904 and, though accepted to Harvard, enrolled in the School of Fine Arts in Boston the next year.

by · 02/27/2017 · Comments are Disabled · S.C. Encyclopedia
A mural of the Dixie Hummingbirds in Philadelphia, Pa.

HISTORY: Dixie Hummingbirds

S.C. Encyclopedia | Started in 1928 by twelve-year-old James Davis and neighborhood friends Bonnie Gipson, Jr., Fred Owens, and Barney Parks, the gospel quartet—and later quintet—influenced scores of gospel, soul, and rock and roll artists. First called the Sterling High School Quartet, named for the high school the young men attended in their hometown of Greenville, the group made the transition from a cappella harmony singing at the Bethel Church of God to electrified music.

by · 02/20/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, S.C. Encyclopedia