Features

Huntington working on a sculpture of a horse.

HISTORY:  Anna Hyatt Huntington

S.C. Encyclopedia  |  Sculptor Anna Hyatt Huntington was born in Cambridge, Mass., on March 10, 1876, the daughter of noted paleontologist, naturalist, and Harvard professor, Alpheus Hyatt. She planned to become a concert violinist before her sister encouraged her to try sculpture. As early as 1898 she began to exhibit her work, and by 1906 she had established a reputation as a fine sculptor of animals. She studied briefly under Henry Hudson Kitson of Boston and in the Art Students’ League in New York, and she received valuable criticism from Gustav Borglum. She also studied with Hermon Atkins MacNeil, George Grey Barnard, Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, and Malvina Hoffman.

REVIEW:  My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She’s Sorry by Fredrik Backman

REVIEW: My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She’s Sorry by Fredrik Backman

Reviewed by Michel Hammes: “In another intriguing tale from the author of A Man Called Ove, you meet a collection of characters living in an apartment complex in Britain. Elsa is a young girl trying to find her way in a world where she doesn’t fit. Her grandmother is her best friend and with a penchant for mischievousness- the two often get up to trouble in hilarious ways.”

Reenactors model conquistador clothing. NPS photo.

HISTORY:  Explorer Juan Pardo

S.C. Encyclopedia  |  Juan Pardo was born in Cuenca, Spain, in the first half of the sixteenth century. He traveled to Spanish Florida in the fleet of General Sancho de Archiniega in 1566 as the captain of one of the six military companies sent to reinforce the colony founded by Governor Pedro Menéndez de Avilés in 1565. Captain Pardo’s company was the only one from the Archiniega expedition posted to the Spanish town of Santa Elena, which was located on present-day Parris Island, South Carolina.

REVIEW:    Lockdown by Laurie R. King

REVIEW:    Lockdown by Laurie R. King

Linda Stewart: Career Day is to be the defining moment of Principal Linda McDonald’s tenure at Guadalupe Middle School.  This struggling school has dealt with so much bad press over the last year – the murder of a former student, the disappearance of a sixth-grader. 

HISTORY:  Penn Center

HISTORY:  Penn Center

S.C. Encyclopedia  |  Located on St. Helena Island in Beaufort County, Penn Center, Inc., originated as the Penn Normal School. The school was established in 1862 on St. Helena by the northern missionaries Laura Towne and Ellen Murray. It was one of approximately thirty schools built on St. Helena as part of the Port Royal Experiment, an effort by northern missionaries to educate formerly enslaved Africans and prepare them for life after slavery.

REVIEW:  Lowcountry Boil by Susan M. Boyer

REVIEW:  Lowcountry Boil by Susan M. Boyer

Reviewed by Whitney Lebron: What had me grab this book off the shelf was: a) it had Lowcountry in the title, and b) the line on the back saying, “Private Investigator Liz Talbot is a modern Southern belle: she blesses hearts and takes names.”.  I decided right then and there to read this book.  I was not disappointed in the slightest. 

by · 07/03/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, Reviews
PALMETTO POEM, Meyers: back from the woods inside me

PALMETTO POEM, Meyers: back from the woods inside me

By Susan Laughter Meyers

back from the woods inside me
chickadee silence

nothing I can say to myself so full
the not saying

when I opened the nesting box
what looked slight

HISTORY:  Thomas Lynch Jr., signer of the Declaration of Independence

HISTORY:  Thomas Lynch Jr., signer of the Declaration of Independence

S.C. Encyclopedia  |  Born on August 5, 1749, in Prince George Winyah Parish, Thomas Lynch Jr. was the only son of Thomas Lynch, Sr. (ca. 1727–1776), and Elizabeth Allston. He attended the Indigo Society School in Georgetown and then traveled to England to pursue his education. There, he enrolled at Eton and then Caius College, Cambridge. Lynch also read law at the Middle Temple in London.

by · 07/03/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, S.C. Encyclopedia
REVIEW:   Under the Harrow by Flynn Berry

REVIEW:   Under the Harrow by Flynn Berry

Reviewed by Mike Nelson | Under the Harrow {Flynn Berry) is an intriguing look at the relationship between two sisters, Nora and Rachel. Rachel is a successful nurse, living close to Oxford, an hour’s train ride from London. Her slightly younger sister, Rachel, has an ill-defined job in the city. On one of her many weekend visits, Nora arrives at Rachel’s house to find her sister brutally killed.

by · 06/26/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, Reviews
HISTORY:  Old Exchange Building, Charleston

HISTORY:  Old Exchange Building, Charleston

S.C. Encyclopedia  |  One of the grandest and most significant public buildings constructed in colonial America, the Exchange and Customs House at 122 East Bay was designed by William Rigby Naylor in 1766 and constructed by Peter and John Adam Horlbeck between 1767 and 1771 on the site of the earlier “Court of Guard” and Half-Moon Battery. The original design included a cellar, a first-floor open arcaded piazza, and a large second-floor assembly room. The roof was hipped with a parapet and lead-coated cupola.

by · 06/26/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, S.C. Encyclopedia