Features

HISTORY: Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge

HISTORY: Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge

S.C. Encyclopedia  |   Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1932 as a wintering ground for migratory waterfowl. Located in Charleston County and stretching for twenty-two miles along the coast between Charleston and the Santee River delta, Cape Romain is a rich natural resource. In its shallow bays, tides combine the life-giving nourishment of the ocean with the nutrient-laden freshwaters of rivers to make one of the most productive environments on earth. Plants and animals from the land, rivers, and ocean are all present at Cape Romain, and all are dependent on the delicate balance of the marshlands.

HISTORY:  Citizens’ councils in South Carolina

HISTORY:  Citizens’ councils in South Carolina

S.C. Encyclopedia  |   Founded in 1954 in Indianola, Mississippi, Citizens’ Councils quickly spread across the South. The organizations promoted membership as a “respectable” way for disgruntled segregationists to protest civil rights activism. The councils distributed pro-segregation propaganda and attempted to protect the legality of racial segregation throughout the South. They publicly renounced violence but encouraged organized economic pressure against African Americans and whites who were sympathetic to the black freedom struggle.

PALMETTO POEM:  A Paltry Light

PALMETTO POEM: A Paltry Light

By Danielle DeTiberus, special to Charleston Currents

What if the sunset last night—the waves
impossibly pink and the sand’s sheen
a soft mirror to the darkening

lavender sky— belonged to me
so that I could give it all to you?
What if I could take a page, colder

by · 01/08/2018 · 1 comment · Features, Palmetto Poem
HISTORY:  ACE Basin

HISTORY:  ACE Basin

S.C. Encyclopedia  |  The ACE Basin consists of around 350,000 acres in the watershed of the Ashepoo, Combahee and Edisto Rivers in the South Carolina Lowcountry, which drains one-fifth of the state. The ACE Basin encompasses a range of ecosystem types from forested uplands to tidal marsh (salt, brackish, and fresh water). The basin is home for more than 260 permanent and seasonal bird species and seventeen rare or endangered species, including the wood stork and the loggerhead turtle.

History, as much as geography, unites the three rivers. By the 1750s the rivers were lined with plantations dedicated to rice production and using African slaves for the arduous labor required. Most plantations controlled tidal flows by a series of floodgates (rice trunks), dikes, and canals to grow vast amounts of rice.

HISTORY:  Circular Congregational Church, Charleston

HISTORY:  Circular Congregational Church, Charleston

S.C. Encyclopedia  |  Circular Congregational Church, dedicated in 1892, is the fourth house of worship on this site at 150 Meeting Street in Charleston. Its Richardsonian Romanesque style reflects Charleston’s tradition of adopting current architectural fashion for ecclesiastical buildings, despite the city’s famous conservatism in residential design.

Followers of many creeds populated early Charleston. The city’s first congregations, St. Philip’s (Church of England) and the Dissenter’s Society, were organized in 1681. Builders of the “White Meeting House” that gave Meeting Street its name, the Dissenters included Presbyterians, Huguenots, and Congregationalists. French Protestants soon had their own church and others withdrew to form First (Scots) Presbyterian, but the independent church flourished, dedicating a larger building in 1732.

by · 01/01/2018 · Comments are Disabled · Features, S.C. Encyclopedia
HISTORY:  Early Judaism in South Carolina

HISTORY:  Early Judaism in South Carolina

S.C. Encyclopedia  |  Following the Revolutionary War, South Carolina’s Jewish population surged. When Columbia became the state capital in 1786, seven Jewish men from Charleston were among the first to buy town lots.

Jews arrived in the British colony of Carolina with the first wave of European settlement. A new outpost in the mercantile traffic of the Atlantic basin, Carolina offered economic opportunities, as well as risks, and a degree of religious tolerance remarkable for the time. The colony’s Fundamental Constitutions of 1669 granted freedom of worship to “Jews, Heathens, and other Dissenters from the purity of the Christian Religion.” Although the colonial assembly never endorsed the provision, British Charleston became known as a place where people of all faiths—except Catholics—could do business and practice their religion without interference. In 1696 Jews in Charleston allied with French Huguenots to safeguard their rights to trade and the next year to secure citizenship.

by · 12/18/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, S.C. Encyclopedia
HISTORY:  South Caroliniana Library

HISTORY:  South Caroliniana Library

S.C. Encyclopedia  |  The South Caroliniana Library building was completed in 1840 as the central library building for South Carolina College (later the University of South Carolina). It was the first freestanding college library building in the United States, predating those of Harvard (1841), Yale (1846), and Princeton (1873).

The structure contains design elements from several architects, most notably the South Carolina native and federal architect Robert Mills. A typical Mills architectural feature is the curved stairway leading to the second-floor reading room, which was closely modeled after the original Library of Congress.

by · 12/11/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, S.C. Encyclopedia
PALMETTO POEM:  Two poems by Tim Conroy

PALMETTO POEM:  Two poems by Tim Conroy

A poem by Tim Conroy:

Is there a safe path
even with a light aimed
perfectly on the walkway
or upon the camellia bushes?
We imagine a world
with shadows everywhere,
lurking to steal lives….

by · 12/04/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, Palmetto Poem
REVIEW:  Magpie Murders

REVIEW:  Magpie Murders

By Whitney Lebron, Mount Pleasant Regional Library  |  Susan Ryeland, editor for London based Clover books, receives a manuscript for the latest of the well-known and loved Atticus Pünd series by a not so endearing author Alan Conway. Thinking it’ll be the same traditional formula that has proven highly successful, Susan is caught off guard when she becomes convinced that there is a hidden story of real-life greed and ambition in the manuscript.

by · 12/04/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, Reviews
HISTORY: South Carolina barbecue

HISTORY: South Carolina barbecue

S.C. Encyclopedia | South Carolina barbecue is slowly cooked, hand-pulled or shredded pork that is flavored with a tangy sauce and usually served with side dishes such as rice, hash, coleslaw, sweet pickles, white bread, and iced tea. Barbecue often is served on festive occasions such as holidays, family reunions, weddings, church and community fundraisers, football tailgating parties, and political meetings. It varies widely across the state with respect to cooking methods, cuts of pork, sauce type, and side dishes served. Barbecue is often the topic of friendly debate since many South Carolinians have strong preferences for particular types that reflect the cultural character and identity of specific regions or places.

by · 12/04/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, S.C. Encyclopedia