Features

REVIEW:    The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend

REVIEW: The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend

A novel by Katarina Bivald

Reviewed by Whitney Lebron | Originally written in Swedish and translated into English, this debut novel by Katarina Bivald is heartwarming and endearing. Sara travels half way around the world from Sweden to Broken Wheel, Iowa, to meet her pen pal Amy, only to arrive and find out that Amy’s funeral has just ended. The townspeople of Broken Wheel take Sara under their wing, even though they find her love for books and reading a bit peculiar. Sara decides to open up a bookstore in honor of friend’s memory and to share the books she loves with the citizens of Broken Wheel.

HISTORY:  Pierce Butler, signer of the U.S. Constitution

HISTORY: Pierce Butler, signer of the U.S. Constitution

S.C. Encyclopedia | Pierce Butler was born on July 11, 1744, in county Carlow, Ireland, the son of Henrietta Percy and Sir Richard Butler, fifth baronet of Cloughgrenan. His parents purchased a commission for Butler in the British army, and he rose through the ranks quickly. In 1766 he attained the rank of major, and in 1768 Butler’s regiment (the Twenty-ninth Foot) was transferred to South Carolina. Butler gained entry into Charleston society through his marriage to Mary Middleton on January 10, 1771. When his regiment returned to England in 1773, Butler sold his commission and remained in Charleston.

Martin

HISTORY: Maria Martin, artist and naturalist

S.C. Encyclopedia | Maria Martin was born in Charleston on July 6, 1796, the youngest daughter of John Jacob Martin and Rebecca Solars. While no records of her formal schooling have been discovered, it is known that she was well read in literature, French, and German and possessed an interest in music, art, and natural science. By 1827 she and her mother had moved into the home of her brother-in-law, the Lutheran minister and naturalist John Bachman, and her ailing sister Harriet. Martin helped to raise and educate her sister’s fourteen children and manage the household.

REVIEW:    Captain Fantastic

REVIEW: Captain Fantastic

A film review by Darryl Woods | In this overlooked indie film, Viggo Mortenson (who was nominated for an Academy Award as Best Actor for this role) plays the man who has been raising his six kids off-the-grid alone. When he discovers that his ill wife has passed, he takes his family across the country to confront his contentious in-laws.

REVIEW:  An Obvious Fact, by Craig Johnson

REVIEW: An Obvious Fact, by Craig Johnson

Cary Jones: The basis of the hit television series Longmire, fans of author CJ Box should take note of the Longmire series by Johnson. Similar to the television series, the print version of Sheriff Walt Longmire is painted as a witty, charming, and brooding character.

by · 05/08/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, Reviews
REVIEW:  A Travel Guide to World War II Sites in Italy

REVIEW: A Travel Guide to World War II Sites in Italy

A book by Anne Leslie Saunders

Reviewed by Andy Brack | A way to make history come alive is to visit places where it happened. If you’re into World War II history, an updated and expanded second edition of local author Anne Leslie Saunders’ guide to World War II sites in Italy and Sicily will serve you well.

by · 05/01/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, Reviews
HISTORY:  Asparagus in South Carolina

HISTORY: Asparagus in South Carolina

S.C. Encyclopedia | Asparagus was an important cash crop in South Carolina from the 1910s until the mid-1930s. Commercial asparagus production began in response to the “cotton problem.” With cotton prices low and the boll weevil creeping ever closer, farmers in the “Ridge” counties of Aiken, Edgefield, and Saluda began planting asparagus to supplement their dwindling cotton incomes.

by · 04/30/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, S.C. Encyclopedia
PALMETTO POEM:  Strange Fruit

PALMETTO POEM: Strange Fruit

By Damarius Allen, special to Charleston Currents

Strange fruit swinging from those trees
The strangest fruit you’ve ever seen

Picked before it could ripen
Ripped from its home that tree of life
And hanged on another

by · 04/30/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, Palmetto Poem
REVIEW:  Ladies, Women, and Wenches

REVIEW: Ladies, Women, and Wenches

Ladies, Women, and Wenches: Choice and Constraint in Antebellum Charleston and Boston
Nonfiction by Jane. H. Pease & William H. Pease
Reviewed by Marianne Cawley

This is an interesting book that compares and contrasts urban women’s lives in Charleston and Boston between 1820 and 1850. This was at a time when New York was emerging as the dominant port and financial center on the East Coast, bypassing both cities and challenging their economic survival.

by · 04/24/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, Reviews
HISTORY: Botanists Andre Michaux and Francois-Andre Michaux

HISTORY: Botanists Andre Michaux and Francois-Andre Michaux

S.C. Encyclopedia | André Michaux was born on March 7, 1746, at Satory, France, son of the farmer André Michaux and Marie-Charlotte Barbet. Interested in plants from an early age, Michaux in 1785 was commissioned as royal botanist with the mission of finding useful plants for France in America. Originally landing in New York, he arrived in Charleston on September 21, 1786. The city became his base of operations as he ranged over North America as far south as Florida and as far north as Hudson Bay.

by · 04/24/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Features, S.C. Encyclopedia