Articles by: Charleston Currents

HISTORY:  ACE Basin

HISTORY:  ACE Basin

S.C. Encyclopedia  |  The ACE Basin consists of around 350,000 acres in the watershed of the Ashepoo, Combahee and Edisto Rivers in the South Carolina Lowcountry, which drains one-fifth of the state. The ACE Basin encompasses a range of ecosystem types from forested uplands to tidal marsh (salt, brackish, and fresh water). The basin is home for more than 260 permanent and seasonal bird species and seventeen rare or endangered species, including the wood stork and the loggerhead turtle.

History, as much as geography, unites the three rivers. By the 1750s the rivers were lined with plantations dedicated to rice production and using African slaves for the arduous labor required. Most plantations controlled tidal flows by a series of floodgates (rice trunks), dikes, and canals to grow vast amounts of rice.

GOOD NEWS:  Johns Island Farmers Market to launch fifth year Saturday

GOOD NEWS:  Johns Island Farmers Market to launch fifth year Saturday

Staff reports  |  The Johns Island Farmers Market will launch its fifth year 10 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 13, a delay of a week due to the snow and ice. 

The market, which will be open until 2 p.m., is held at Charleston Collegiate School, 2024 Academy Drive, which can be accessed from River or Bohicket roads. The market has more than 60 new and returning vendors and farmers. More info.

SPOTLIGHT: Charleston Green Commercial

SPOTLIGHT: Charleston Green Commercial

Charleston Green Commercial is a full-service commercial property management company that pays attention to detail, provides exceptional personal service and is committed to adding value to buildings.

"Miriam," by photographer Trey Hopkins.  More: PalmettoPortraitStudio.com.  Used with permission.

MORE PIX of the Great Charleston Snow of 2018

Staff reports  |  With so many people enthusiastically responding with more great photos of the Great Charleston Snow of 2018 [Note to self: Write “snow,” not “snot”] and its slow-melting aftermath, we thought we’d provide you with some more looks about what’s happened in the area.

Below are 30 more photos — this time from two dozen shutterbugs — organized in three basic categories:  People, places and things.  Enjoy seeiing cats, dogs, snowmen, Star Wars snobots, flowers, fruits and even a kid jumping for joy.

PHOTOS: The Great Charleston Snow of 2018

PHOTOS: The Great Charleston Snow of 2018

We’ve collected several photos from around Charleston County of their photographic impressions of the Great Charleston Snow of 2018.  Thanks to all who contributed. (More photos being added now)

Click the link above to findphotos from North Charleston, Hanahan, Sullivan’s Island, Folly Beach, downtown Charleston, West Ashley and James Island.  If you wan to send your photos, send to: editor@charlestoncurrents.com

FOCUS: Lowcountry Local First makes big differences in 10th year

FOCUS: Lowcountry Local First makes big differences in 10th year

By Jamee Haley, special to Charleston Currents  |  2017 was a great year for Lowcountry Local First as we celebrated our first decade of loving our local business community. It was a year full of gratitude, and time spent listening to ensure that your input and priorities guide our work in the decade to come. We’re not slowing down!

1. We celebrated our 10 year anniversary with a community-wide art installation known as “Love a Local,” a proclamationby the Mayor of the City of Charleston, and by honoring 10 Local Luminaries who’ve supported the local business community in major ways.

2. We really listened. We put a lot of energy into gathering feedback from you to help guide the next decade of our work …

by · 01/01/2018 · Comments are Disabled · Focus, Good news
GOOD NEWS: Exhibit of Cuba photographs on display at main library

GOOD NEWS: Exhibit of Cuba photographs on display at main library

Staff reports  |  “Cuba, 2015” is a series of large digital photographs now on display at the Saul Alexander Gallery at the main branch of the Charleston County Public Library.  The photos showcase glimpses of Cuba taken during an August 2015 trip by a group organized by Magnolia Plantations and Gardens.

The photographs by Charleston Currents editor and publisher Andy Brack first were published in this weekly journal. 

“While you get something of a feel of life in Cuba in the online presentations of the photos from 2015, the large-scale, framed format offered in the exhibition gives a different feel – a depth that doesn’t come out on the computer screen,” Brack said.  “I encourage you to stop by the library, see the photos and provide your reactions in a comment book in the gallery.”

The exhibition will run through the end of January.

CALENDAR, Jan. 1+: Berman’s civil rights photos on display at library

CALENDAR, Jan. 1+: Berman’s civil rights photos on display at library

Staff reports  |  If you want to know more of what life was like on Johns Island as the civil rights movement was blossoming, you should see Ida Berman’s collection of photographs now on display at the Charleston County Public Library, 68 Calhoun St., Charleston.

A celebrated photographer and immigrant, Berman snapped these never-before-seen photos of places and scenes on the sea island from January 1959 include people working at The Progressive Club as well as portraits of civil rights leaders Esau Jenkins, Myles Horton, Septima Clark and others. 

Special Jan. 4 event: Candie Carawan, who published the landmark, “Ain’t You Got a Right to the Tree of Life?” with husband Guy Carawan, will share civil rights stories with Team Backpack journalists 5:30 p.m. Jan. 4 in the library’s auditorium.  The book includes statements from Johns Island residents during the modern civil rights movement. 

by · 01/01/2018 · Comments are Disabled · calendar
MYSTERY PHOTO:  The remains of a day

MYSTERY PHOTO:  The remains of a day

The remains of this building have a place in area history, but what was it?  (Hint:  It could be related to something mentioned in this issue.) Send your best guess – plus your name and hometown – to editor@charlestoncurrents.com.  In the subject line, write: “Mystery Photo guess.”

The Dec. 18 mystery, contributed by Hanahan photographer Chuck Boyd, shows the postal museum at the U.S. Post Office at the corner of Meeting and Broad streets in Charleston – one of the infamous Four Corners of Law.

Hats off to several alert readers who correctly identified the display:  Michael Kaynard, J.J. Anderson and Kristina Wheeler of Charleston; Chris Brooks of Mount Pleasant; former James Island resident Tom Brown of Jacksonville, Fla.; Judy Roumillat of North Charleston; George Graf of Palmyra, Va.; and Archie Burkel of James Island.

by · 01/01/2018 · Comments are Disabled · Mystery Photo, Photos
HISTORY:  Circular Congregational Church, Charleston

HISTORY:  Circular Congregational Church, Charleston

S.C. Encyclopedia  |  Circular Congregational Church, dedicated in 1892, is the fourth house of worship on this site at 150 Meeting Street in Charleston. Its Richardsonian Romanesque style reflects Charleston’s tradition of adopting current architectural fashion for ecclesiastical buildings, despite the city’s famous conservatism in residential design.

Followers of many creeds populated early Charleston. The city’s first congregations, St. Philip’s (Church of England) and the Dissenter’s Society, were organized in 1681. Builders of the “White Meeting House” that gave Meeting Street its name, the Dissenters included Presbyterians, Huguenots, and Congregationalists. French Protestants soon had their own church and others withdrew to form First (Scots) Presbyterian, but the independent church flourished, dedicating a larger building in 1732.

by · 01/01/2018 · Comments are Disabled · Features, S.C. Encyclopedia