Articles by: Charleston Currents

CALENDAR, Feb. 19+:  Workshops, book sale, Lewis Black

CALENDAR, Feb. 19+:  Workshops, book sale, Lewis Black

Free tax workshop: 9 a.m. to noon, Feb. 23, Trident United Way conference room, 6296 Rivers Avenue, Suite 101, North Charleston.  The S.C. Small Business Development Center and partners will offer a free tax workshop for small business owners to provide information and instruction on business taxes and related topics.  To register, call 843.740.6160.

School board workshop: 10 a.m. to non, Feb. 24, Lonnie Hamilton Public Services Building, 4045 Bridge View Drive, North Charleston 29405.  The League of Women Voters of Charleston will offer a free workshop to review what it takes to be a school board candidate or advocate for the 113,000 area children in public schools.  While free, an advance reservation is requested at http://lwvcharleston.org/school_board_2018.html

Spring book sale:  Starts at 9 a.m. on March 2 and March 3, Otranto Regional Library, 2261 Otranto Road, North Charleston.  Charleston Friends of the Library will have more than 10,000 gently used books, CDs, DVDs and audio books at prices that can’t be beat at this annual sale.  Free admission.  More info.  

by · 02/19/2018 · 0 comments · calendar
FOCUS: A deeper look at Black History Month by a local academic

FOCUS: A deeper look at Black History Month by a local academic

From the College of Charleston |  For Kameelah L. Martin, director of African American Studies at the College of Charleston, it was the Lowcountry’s rich ties to the African-American community and heritage that drew her to join the faculty in fall 2017. Martin, who holds a bachelor’s degree in English from Georgia Southern University, a master’s in Afro-American Studies from the University of California, Los Angeles, and a doctorate in English from Florida State University, came to the College after serving on the faculty of Savannah State University where she taught in the Department of English, Language, and Cultures.

As a literary scholar, Martin, who teaches both English and African American Studies at CofC, is interested in African-American culture, feminism and spirituality – interests which are reflected in her two books, Conjuring Moments in African American Literature: Women, Spirit Work, and Other Such Hoodoo and Envisioning Black Feminist Voodoo Aesthetics: African Spirituality in American Cinema.

“I was most drawn to the history of Charleston and its importance to African-American culture,” says Martin. “My secondary area of study is folklore and the Gullah Geechee culture is a huge part of my interest. I teach about and research the region, so it was very attractive as a place to put down roots – or replant them!”

by · 02/19/2018 · 0 comments · Focus, Good news
MY TURN, Palm:  Let’s focus on the common good

MY TURN, Palm:  Let’s focus on the common good

By Fred Palm, contributing columnist  |  The recent eighth government shutdown since 1980 provides an opportunity to consider the “common good” in America and why we need to embrace it.

After our Revolutionary War the winners set about to invent a way to govern a nation that was not available. The founders gathered in Philadelphia to specify a model of governance to provide the people with the opportunity for “life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness” that was expressed in Declaration of Independence in the prior decade.

The common good is central in the construction of our constitutional institutions.  The executive, legislative and judicial powers expressed in the Constitution of the United States are divided at the federal level and similarly divided among the three elements in the states in a federalism structure. For good measure, the “bill of rights” amendments are carved out to specify what was out of reach of governance and belonged to the people, as opposed to those holding authority.

GOOD NEWS:  Program offers chance to spend night in Old Jail — voluntarily

GOOD NEWS:  Program offers chance to spend night in Old Jail — voluntarily

Staff reports  |  The Slave Dwelling Project will host a March 4 discussion of recidivism during a at the Old Charleston Jail.  Following the discussion will be a chance for listeners to spend the night in the building.

The Slave Dwelling Project uses antebellum historic buildings as classrooms to interpret African American history. The jail was built in 1802 using slave labor and slave-made bricks. Members of the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry were held captive there after they were captured during the Assault on Battery Wagner on Morris Island on July 18, 1863.

During the March 4 event, Charleston County Public Library historian Nic Butler will discuss the history of law enforcement in Charleston County.  Charleston Interim Chief of Police Jerome Taylor will address the audience on programs that the Charleston Police Department has in place to address the recidivism rate of African Americans. African Americans represent a disproportionate rate of inmates in the American prison system.

MYSTERY PHOTO:   Mystery house

MYSTERY PHOTO:   Mystery house

We bet this South Carolina home looks familiar to some of you, but where is it – and what’s its importance? Send your guess to editor@charlestoncurrents.com with “Mystery Photo” in the subject line.   Please make sure to include your name and contact information.

The Feb. 12 mystery, shown at right, is the main building at Wofford College in Spartanburg. Congratulations to all of those who correctly identified it:  Hal Creel of Folly Beach; Chris Brooks of Mount Pleasant; Tom Tindall of Edisto Island; Bill Segars of Hartsville; Jeff McWhorter, Robert Behre, Joseph Tecklenburg and Cheryl Smithem, all of Charleston; Ross Lenhart of Pawleys Island; and George Graf of Palmyra, Va.

HISTORY:  Women’s suffrage in South Carolina

HISTORY:  Women’s suffrage in South Carolina

S.C. Encyclopedia | The enfranchisement of women in South Carolina was first discussed publicly during the Reconstruction period. A women’s rights convention held in Columbia in December 1870 received a warm letter of support from Governor R. K. Scott. In 1872 the General Assembly endorsed a petition of the American Woman Suffrage Association to grant women political rights, but it adjourned without taking any specific action. The earliest suffrage clubs in the state were not organized until the 1890s, but suffragists were beginning to receive notice. Writing for the Charleston News and Courier in 1882, the journalist N. G. Gonzales described the typical suffragist as “thirty to sixty, a majority of considerable embonpoint, a majority passable looking, a majority with gray hair and a majority wearing bright colors.”

SPOTLIGHT: SCIWAY

SPOTLIGHT: SCIWAY

Pronounced “sky-way,” SCIWAY is South Carolina’s Information Superhighway — the largest and most comprehensive directory of South Carolina information on the Internet.

Photo by Leigh Sabine

CALENDAR, Feb. 12+:  SEWE returns to Charleston this week

Staff reports  |  The Southeastern Wildlife Exposition returns to Charleston starting Feb. 16 for the annual three-day sportsman’s extravaganza that brings thousands to the Holy City to enjoy wildlife and nature-oriented activities. An awards dinner is set for Feb. 14, followed by private viewing hours and a gala on Feb. 15.

This year, wildlife enthusiasts will enjoy everything from art auctions and sales to balls, oyster roasts and wildlife tours.  There will be education events, such as the Feb. 18 discussion by Garden & Gun on the future of oyster aquaculture, and fun events, such as the always-popular Dock Dogs performances.

by · 02/12/2018 · 0 comments · calendar
Photo courtesy of Charleston International Airport.

GOOD NEWS:  Frontier Airlines adds flights to Austin, Trenton

Staff reports  |  Low-fare carrier Frontier Airlines last week announced it will begin the only nonstop flights to Austin, Texas, and Trenton, N.J. in April. This announcement comes before the carrier even begins service at Charleston International Airport on Feb. 20 with previously announced nonstop flights to Denver and Philadelphia. Flights to Chicago start in May.

“Even though we have yet to start service, the Charleston community has already embraced our unique brand of ‘Low Fares, Done Right,’” said Scott Fisher, senior director of ancillary revenue and loyalty for Frontier Airlines. “We are committed to making flying affordable for everyone and to be adding new service here before our first flights have even departed speaks to the early support of the community and our partners here at the Charleston airport. With these two new flights, we will now offer low-cost, nonstop flights to five great destinations.”

MYSTERY PHOTO:   Twin towers

MYSTERY PHOTO:   Twin towers

Where are these impressive twin towers located in South Carolina? Send your guess to editor@charlestoncurrents.com with “Mystery Photo” in the subject line.   Please make sure to include your name and contact information.

Last issue’s mystery: The Jan. 29 mystery, shown at right, was a picture from 1979 of the railroad station in Branchville, S.C. What’s interesting about it is how two sets of tracks split with the station in the middle. Hats off to those who correctly identified the image: George Graf of Palmyra, Va., Tom Tindall and Mary Honey Coan, both of Edisto Island; Paul Hedden of James Island; and Mary Bush Bryan of Hampton, S.C. (If there were others, we apologize for not identifying you, but some of our inbound emails over the last week didn’t get to us.)