Articles by: Charleston Currents

REVIEW: A Really Good Day, by Ayelet Waldman

REVIEW: A Really Good Day, by Ayelet Waldman

Jen McQueen: “Writer Ayelet Waldman (Bad Mother) tried everything – meditation, psychotherapy, therapy, and prescription drugs – to treat her depression, premenstrual dysphoric disorder, and mood swings. Yet despite years of effort, this talented and successful woman continued to drive herself, her friends, and her family – including a saintly husband, the writer Michael Chabon – bonkers.”

MYSTERY PHOTO:  Something you may see if you look up

MYSTERY PHOTO:  Something you may see if you look up

Too many times, we don’t look up and see amazing things like this skylight.  But where is it?  Send your best guess to:  editor@charlestoncurrents.com — and make sure to include the name of the town in which you live.  Please also write “Mystery Photo” in the subject line.

S.C. ENCYCLOPEDIA:  Archibald Rutledge, poet

S.C. ENCYCLOPEDIA:  Archibald Rutledge, poet

S.C. Encyclopedia  |  Archibald Rutledge was born in McClellanville, South Carolina, on October 23, 1883, the son of Henry Middleton Rutledge III, an army officer, and Margaret Hamilton. Descended from a lineage of notable South Carolinians, Rutledge included among his ancestors John Rutledge, Edward Rutledge, Arthur Middleton, Charles Cotesworth Pinckney, and Thomas Pinckney.

SPOTLIGHT: Magnolia Plantation and Gardens

SPOTLIGHT: Magnolia Plantation and Gardens

Today we shine our spotlight on Magnolia Plantation and Gardens, founded in 1676 by the Drayton family. It is the oldest public tourist site in the Lowcountry and the oldest public gardens in America, opening its doors to visitors in 1870.

REVIEW:  Piece of the World, by Christina Baker Kline

REVIEW:  Piece of the World, by Christina Baker Kline

Review by Michel Hammes | From the author of Orphan Train, comes another historical fiction piece about the imagined life of the muse in Andrew Wyeth’s painting Christina’s World. Kline weaves fact and fiction to tell a compelling story about Christina, living on her family’s rural farm, dealing with illness and coming to terms with the prospect of leading a small life.

TODAY’S FOCUS:  Charleston’s bus evacuation system wasn’t ready for storm

TODAY’S FOCUS:  Charleston’s bus evacuation system wasn’t ready for storm

By William J. Hamilton  |  Best Friends of Lowcountry Transit became aware that the Lowcountry’s Emergency Bus Evacuation System, another almost entirely separate transit system from Tri County Link and CARTA, wasn’t ready for a major hurricane on Sept. 5. We blogged the issue and informed local officials with a positively focused post on the Daily Kos, a national news site titled Power and Efficiency of Public Transit can save Low country lives before and after a Hurricane.

Hamilton
Neither CARTA bus drivers nor the public had any detailed knowledge of this alternative bus route system. Maps and schedules could have been handed out to transit riders, who often come from households without private cars and communities where cars are less available.

by · 09/18/2017 · 3 comments · Focus, Good news
MYSTERY PHOTO:  Locating another mystery downtown

MYSTERY PHOTO:  Locating another mystery downtown

The recent mystery photo of a downtown inspired us to find a photo of another downtown in the Lowcountry.  Where is this one?  Send your best guess to:  editor@charlestoncurrents.com — and make sure to include the name of the town in which you live.  Please also write “Mystery Photo” in the subject line.

S.C. ENCYCLOPEDIA:  Colleton County

S.C. ENCYCLOPEDIA:  Colleton County

S.C. Encyclopedia  |  First visited by Robert Sandford in 1666 while he was reconnoitering the southeastern seaboard of North America for Lord Anthony Ashley Cooper, Colleton County was one of three original counties organized in the English province of Carolina in 1682. However, Colleton was divided into three parishes by 1730 (St. Bartholomew’s, St. Paul’s, and St. John’s Colleton), which took over most county responsibilities, including oversight of elections.

REVIEW:  Down by the Riverside: A South Carolina Slave Community

REVIEW:  Down by the Riverside: A South Carolina Slave Community

Reviewed by Marianne Cawley | The splendid reputation of this book is completely well deserved.  Published in 1984, Down by the Riverside was one of a new wave of works of history that looked at a specific defined community over an extended period in the hope that better understanding of the parts would bring greater knowledge of the whole history of a wider region.

CALENDAR, Sept. 11+:  Great food, plays, Fam Jam ahead

CALENDAR, Sept. 11+:  Great food, plays, Fam Jam ahead

Charleston Restaurant Week:  Through Sept. 17, around the area.  The Greater Charleston Restaurant Association presents the annual event to allow people to enjoy world-renowned cuisine at prices a little lower than usual.  More.

“An Act of God:” Various times, Sept. 15 to Oct. 1, Footlight Players Theatre, 20 Queen St., Charleston.  The Footlight Players will perform this clever, one-act comedy that’s based on a satirical book and Twitter account.  Shows are at 8 p.m., except for Sunday matinees at 3 p.m.  Tickets are $30 for adults.  More.

Love Potion No. 9:  Various times, Sept. 15 to Nov. 11, 200 Meeting St., Charleston.  The post-apocalyptic doo-wop musical will be presented by 34 West Theater Company at various times on Tuesdays, and Thursdays through Sundays  with tickets at $35.  More.

Children’s Museum Fam Jam: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Sept. 16, Marion Square, Charleston.  The free festival, held in conjunction with more than 30 partners, celebrates family, community togetherness and the power of play as Marion Square is transformed into an engaging, innovative playscape.  Free.

by · 09/11/2017 · 0 comments · calendar