Articles by: Andy Brack

PALMETTO POEM: Eclipse 2017

PALMETTO POEM: Eclipse 2017

By Marjory Wentworth, contributing editor

Astronomy flourished at the dawn of civilization;
between the Tigris and Euphrates, Babylonian
astronomers watched the skies closely.
We have the records. When heavenly signs appeared,
the ancients were both fascinated and terrified. …

by · 08/21/2017 · 0 comments · Features, Palmetto Poem
MYSTERY PHOTO:  This may be a pretty relevant building this week

MYSTERY PHOTO:  This may be a pretty relevant building this week

The only clues we’ll give you about this building are that the building may have some relevance on Aug. 21 and it is in South Carolina.  Send your best guess to:  editor@charlestoncurrents.com — and make sure to include the name of the town in which you live.  Please also write “Mystery Photo” in the subject line.

by · 08/21/2017 · 0 comments · Mystery Photo, Photos
HISTORY:  Scientist Lewis R. Gibbes

HISTORY:  Scientist Lewis R. Gibbes

S.C. Encyclopedia  |  Lewis (or Louis) Reeve Gibbes was born in Charleston on August 14, 1810, eldest of the eight children of Lewis Ladson Gibbes and his wife, Maria Henrietta Drayton. Gibbes attended grammar school in Charleston and Philadelphia, then prepared for college at the Pendleton Academy in the South Carolina upcountry, where he excelled in mathematics and the classics. A student of five languages, he showed an early interest in botany, astronomy, and physics. Gibbes entered South Carolina College soon after graduating first in his class from Pendleton Academy in 1827. For a time in 1830 he was the classics teacher and acting principal at Pendleton Academy. Later that year he enrolled in the Medical College of South Carolina, in Charleston.

BRACK:  Don’t leave your furry friends in hot cars

BRACK:  Don’t leave your furry friends in hot cars

By Andy Brack, editor and publisher  |  The passenger window was cracked about two inches on a hazy Charleston morning.  It wasn’t too hot yet, but the mercury was already 80 degrees.

A little white lap dog panted as it sat on the front seat of the late-model Volvo SUV with Virginia plates.  Where was the owner, I wondered.  Why is the dog in the car?

Also: An excerpt from a column about S.C.’s “policy Einsteins”

by · 08/14/2017 · 0 comments · Andy Brack, Views
BRACK:  S.C. has fewer hate groups, but maybe hate simmers more

BRACK:  S.C. has fewer hate groups, but maybe hate simmers more

By Andy Brack, editor and publisher  |   Ten years ago, South Carolina was littered with real-life hate groups – 43, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center in Alabama.  These days, the number is down to a dozen.

At one point, South Carolina had the highest per capita number of hate groups in the United States, according to Heidi Beirich, intelligence policy director at the Center.

by · 08/07/2017 · 0 comments · Andy Brack, Views
PHOTO:  The Good, The Bad and The Chan

PHOTO:  The Good, The Bad and The Chan

Superheroes, sidekicks and villains participated in “The Good, The Bad and The Chan,” a play written, performed, directed, designed and choreographed by 23 children who attended last week’s drama camp by Storytree Children’s Theatre at the Charleston Gaillard Center.

by · 08/07/2017 · 1 comment · Good news, Photos
McMaster, Bryant, McGill and Templeton

BRACK:  Despite challengers, McMaster favored in 2018 governor’s race

By Andy Brack, editor and publisher  |  After mentioning the lieutenant governor was probably going to jump into the 2018 race for governor, the guy – a well-educated professional with at least two college degrees – asked, “Who’s the lieutenant governor?”

“Kevin Bryant,” I replied.

“Then who’s the governor?” he asked.

“Henry McMaster.”

“O.K.  I’ve heard of him.”

Therein lies the challenge for the growing field of Republicans with gubernatorial aspirations:  McMaster, while not brimming with strength, has buckets of name recognition earned from three decades in state politics, including eight years as attorney general, eight years as head of the state GOP, and statewide campaigns for U.S. Senate, lieutenant governor and governor.

by · 07/31/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Andy Brack, Views
PHOTO: And the walls came tumbling down

PHOTO: And the walls came tumbling down

The claws of this excavator were about to grab part of the 1950s-era Stono Park Elementary School in West Ashley during its demolition over the weekend.  A new school, delayed for years, is set to begin construction soon for a projected fall 2018 opening.

by · 07/31/2017 · Comments are Disabled · Photos
A covered bridge along the New Hampshire and Vermont border at Lunenburg, Vermon.  It is 266 feet long.  Built in 1911.

PHOTO FOCUS:  New Hampshire’s covered bridges

By Andy Brack, editor and publisher  |  One of the joys of traveling across rural New Hampshire is finding loads of covered bridges.  In the northern part of the state just an hour or two from Canada are no less than 28 covered bridges, some dating more than 188 years old to another built just 13 years ago.

Following photos of bridges are some scenic delights from around the Granite State for you to enjoy including a picturesque farm, a 218-year-old meeting house, views from a tall mountain, a typical village green, a ramshackled barn, a nod to politics and lobsters.

by · 07/24/2017 · 2 comments · Focus, Photo Essay, Photos
BRACK:  Let’s refocus state, nation on the “common good”

BRACK:  Let’s refocus state, nation on the “common good”

By Andy Brack, editor and publisher  |  In today’s media-saturated culture that focuses on appealing to individuals through greed and ego, the notion of “common good” may seem as charming and antiquated as the horse and buggy.

It is, however, fundamental to our nation, as highlighted in preamble of the U.S. Constitution, which listed our values in forming a more perfect union:  to “establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity.”

“Welfare” in this case doesn’t mean handouts by the government to people who are down on their luck.  It means people in towns and villages across the country working together to accomplish common goals, or goods, to make their areas better for all.

by · 07/24/2017 · 3 comments · Andy Brack, Views